Posted in animal facts, animals, arctic wildlife, biodiversity, education, Entertainment, environment, Fun Animal Facts, nature, teaching, Wild Animals, wildlife, wildlife education

Chill Dudes

For this round of Fun Animal Facts, we’re taking a look at animals that thrive in the cold. Maybe we can learn some coping techniques from them for the winter months!

  • Polar bears have two layers of fur and a thick layer of body fat, which serve as insulation. Their compact ears and small tails also help prevent heat loss. http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/adaptation/cold-climate
  • Arctic foxes have incredible hearing, aided by their wide, front-facing ears, which allow them to locate the precise position of their prey beneath the snow. When an Arctic fox hears its next meal under the snow-pack, it leaps into the air and pounces, breaking through the layer of snow right onto the prey beneath. http://www.defenders.org/arctic-fox/basic-facts
  • Harp seals often hunt for fish and crustaceans at depths of 300 feet (90 meters) and may dive to nearly 1,000 feet (300 meters). They are able to remain submerged for up to 15 minutes! http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/harp-seal/#harp-seal-closeup.jpg
  •  There are 17 species of penguins in the world, all of which live in the Southern Hemisphere.

    The Little Penguin, also known as the Blue Penguin, is most likely the inspiration for the penguins in the Mario Kart series. http://www.kidzone.ws/animals/penguins/facts10.htm

  • Snow leopards, native to the rugged and snowy highlands of Central Asia, have fur on their stomachs that is about 5 inches thick. https://owlcation.com/stem/Facts-about-Snow-Leopards
  • Snowy owls, like Hedwig from the Harry Potter series, are unique because they mainly hunt in the daytime. http://www.defenders.org/snowy-owl/basic-facts
  • As we’ve mentioned before, fish that live close to icy surfaces have an anti-freeze in their blood that prevents ice from spreading throughout their bodies if they come in contact with it. These “anti-freeze” glycoprotein molecules also provide fish a tiny cushion against the end of sharp ice crystals so the crystals are less likely to puncture cell membranes.

    However, only fish that are likely to encounter ice have these anti-freezes. Deeper living fish, way below the level of floating ice, don’t have anti-freeze, they have a freezing point above that of the sea-water in which they live, and really should be frozen solid. http://www.coolantarctica.com/Antarctica%20fact%20file/science/cold_all_animals.php

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I'm a geek for music whether it be on vinyl, CD, 78 or whatever. My goal is to sniff out the greated music on Earth, specializing in the obscure. I make music myself as well, mostly ambient and sound collage (1 album out and a few remixes so far). I work full time as a professional mascot (it pays the pills) but will soon retire, i hope.

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