Posted in Adaptation, Animal Adaptations, animal behavior, animal facts, animal games, Animal Kingdom, animal mascots, animals, biodiversity, children's books, Community Events, conservation, ecology, education, educational mascots, Entertainment, environment, Mammals, mascots, National Skunk Day, nature, nature camp, nature conservation, Omnivore, Predator, Prey, skunks, summer camps, talking mascots, teaching

Skunks! ROC Animal School’s New Skunk Program!

Stripes the Skunk teaches a family about life as a skunk.

On June 15th, 2019, we debuted our skunk character, Stripes, at the Pittsford Village Community Farmers Market. We celebrated National Skunk Day by hosting a variety of skunk themed activities aimed at educating patrons about this mysterious but smelly creature. Our friends from the Rochester March for Science were on hand as well with scent sensory activities. The day was a roaring success!

After the day was done, I shelved the skunk costume, planning on making some modifications to the suit and refining a draft of the skunk program as a whole. But, the summer season had other plans. I found myself busier than ever with summer camp programs and writing educational animal themed children’s books.

As February of 2020 rolled in, I began work on the skunk suit. I was able to finish the majority of the modifications in a few weeks and shortly thereafter, I focused on revising the program material. I was able to test run everything at the Genesee Country Village and Museum on Sunday, Marth 8th as part of their Nature Sundays series.

The skunk display as set up by our friends at the Genesee Country Village and Museum.

Skunks are actually quite fascinating creatures. Once you realize that spraying is usually a last resort in self defense against would-be predators, they become a lot less maligned. Skunks help keep pesky grubs and wasps at bay. Sure, you may have a few holes here and there in your yard from their quest for food, but, they are efficient and highly effective.

I think what surprised me the most was their poor eyesight. Skunks really can only see things extremely close by. If it’s any further than ten feet away, chances are they won’t see it very well at all. To demonstrate this, I built a set of “skunk vision goggles,” complete with a little skunk nose. Folks can try these on and experience how skunks really can’t see. It changes their perspective on them!

This program is listed on our official roster. It is best suited for smaller audiences as this mask isn’t perfect for dicrion and projecting my voice. The age group is generally for families with kids aged 5 to 10.

Author:

I'm a geek for music whether it be on vinyl, CD, 78 or whatever. My goal is to sniff out the greated music on Earth, specializing in the obscure. I make music myself as well, mostly ambient and sound collage (1 album out and a few remixes so far). I work full time as a professional mascot (it pays the pills) but will soon retire, i hope.

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