Posted in animal behavior, coyote language, coyotes, ecology, education, educational mascots, endangered species, Entertainment, environment, Farmers Markets, foxes, foxes of north america, Fun Animal Facts, vulpines, Western New York Organizations, Wild Animals, wildlife education, wolf Awareness week, wolf conservation, wolf howls, wolf reintroduction, wolf species of north America, wolves

Wolf Awareness Week 2019

By Nick Hadad

Wolf Awareness Week takes place during the third full week of October. It’s a great way for folks to become acquainted with wolves and learn about their history, the different wolf species in North America, their impact on the ecosystem and how political their presence has become.

I had hoped to get this posted during Wolf Awareness Week but I never had enough time to sit and breathe with all of the events I was working. Here’s a little bit on how we here at ROC Animal School celebrate this PAWsome week!

Our Wolf Mascot

Four years ago, we acquired our first talking mascot character. It was a gray wolf that we named Howler. Immediately, I started working on an educational wolf program I could offer to schools, libraries, festivals and other events. We called the program “Lupinology,” essentially meaning the “study of wolves.” I wanted this program to be as comprehensive as possible without becoming too slow or boring. I incorporated several interactive activities, taught all of the wolf vocalizations and their meanings and had the audience take part in a faux elk hunt where they learned how to function as a wolf pack.

Howler became our most popular character. The program was a success and we at times traveled for bours to perform for audiences.

The material was constantly being updated as new scientific studies on wolves were published. I felt that it was paramount that the information be up to date but still digestible to the casual listener. I spoke with quite a few experts to clarify on different topics.

Our First Wolf Awareness Week

The first time we celebrated Wolf Awareness Week, I didn’t have any events planned. Instead, I wrote several short scripts, threw on the wolf costume and filmed a series of videos. They focused on the various North American wolf species (one of which addressed coywolves and featured our coyote mascot) and a brief introduction to wolf conservation. These were uploaded onto the ROC Animal School and Howler Wolf Facebook pages.

Our 2019 Event

The Rochester March for Science started an initiative in 2019 called Science Saturday. These were events that would be set at various public places (libraries, farmers markets, wildlife festivals, etc…) and aimed to bring science (and its numerous fields) to folks of all ages. It would feature multiple booths from different scientific organizations with hands on activities.

They were set to host a Science Saturday on October 19th, one day prior to the kickoff of Wolf Awareness Week 2019. It took place at a library on Lyell Ave in Rochester and it attracted quite a few visitors. I suited up as our mascot and set up our wolf info boards, taught howls, explained about the wolf pack dynamis, and quizzed folks on their knowledge of local animal tracks. I took as much time as I could to answer questions about wolves and their canine cousins, coyotes. Folks came prepared with a lot of inquiries and I was very happy to help them! It was a great day!

The Rest of the Week

Once the event concluded, I decided to employ the use of our social media platforms to share knowledge straight from the sources, chiefly from wolf conservation and scientific research groups and recovery agencies. With so much misinformation going around and changes to the Endangered Species Act, I felt it was important to get as many true facts out as possible.

I had to shift my energy for costumed peeformances toward some other nature events happening so I didn’t get a chance to use Howler as much as I would have liked. I found myself performing as our red fox and raccoon more often that week and over the weekend.

Next Year

It’s my goal to redo the videos I filmed a few years ago. By this point, some of the information is outdated and the overall quality of the audio could be improved. I also hope to have our wolf mascot appear at a few more events during that week to truly spread a little wolf awareness!

Until next time, stay wild!

Posted in Adaptation, Animal Adaptations, animal facts, Animal Kingdom, animal mascots, animals, Arts, biodiversity, birds, birds of prey, Community Events, conservation, coyote language, coyotes, ecology, education, educational mascots, endangered species, Entertainment, foxes, Fun Animal Facts, learning, Mammals, owls, Raptor Research, raptors, talking mascots, Uncategorized

ROC Animal School Spring & Summer Outlook

Swift the Red Fox mascot

The spring and summer of 2018 will be a very productive period for us here at ROC Animal School. After a successful February, we are eager to keep the momentum going! Here’s what we’re up to!

New Programs in Development

We’ve been hard at work creating new educational content. Obviously, our goal is to spread knowledge and to be as involved in the community as possible. While some programs are ready to launch (see below), we have some others in the works that will be ready to go later this year. Currently in development are initiatives to educate people on wildlife native to our area (county and statewide), a program on being a pet parent/domestic animals, an in depth program on local nocturnal animals, as well as new bird of prey programs.

New Programs Launching

We are adding to our list of available programs! Here’s what’s ready to go!

  • Curious about “Coywolves?” – The Eastern Coyote: This program will be hosted by our talking coyote mascot, Dakota, and will focus on the amazing eastern coyote, sometimes referred to as the coywolf. This animal is has a mixture of coyote, wolf and dog DNA which makes it quite an adaptable creature with the ability to call both the countryside and urban areas home. Are you curious about coywolves?
  • Coyote Class: Coyotes are often dubbed the song dog because of their dynamic range of vocalizations. This incredible canine is one of the most adaptable animals of all time, expanding its range across much of North America and making itself right at home in cities as well as the wilderness. Do you have what it takes to live as a coyote? Our mascot, Dakota Coyote will get everyone howling along!
  • Animal Jams – Nature Rocks! Animals can make a lot of noise! Some animals are more musically inclined than others. Come learn about the songs of birds, coyotes, wolves, owls, insects and other wild animals!

And as always, we can create custom programs to fit your needs. Just let us know what you’re looking for!

Animal School: Out and About!

This year, we will be appearing regularly at the Pittsford Famers Market, showcasing new themes every month. This will give us a great chance to interact with more of you while allowing us to hopefully shed some light on what creatures might be living in your backyard and some local environmental issues you might not know about. Or, you can just pop by to learn some fun animal facts while shopping! We’ll have one of our talking mascots on hand at each appearance to give folks the chance to ask them questions about wildlife and maybe get a few selfies!

We will also be appearing at area libraries over the summer, as well as some area festivals. If you haven’t heard by now, we will be attending this year’s Rochester March for Science and Expo on April 14th. We’re really excited!

New Mascot Characters

We are slowly adding to our roster of educational talking mascots. Oslo the Owl just debuted at the annual Owl Moon event at the Genesee Country Village and Museum. We hope to have our lion and Dalmatian up and running by the fall as well. Skye the Eagle, who debuted in October, has been making several appearances alongside our friends from Braddock bay Raptor Research through the month of February.

Stay tuned for more updates as they come!

Until next time, stay wild!

Posted in Animal Ancestors, Animal Descendants, animal facts, Animal Kingdom, animal mascots, Arts, coyotes, education, educational mascots, endangered species, Entertainment, environment, Farm Animals, Mammals, mascots, Misinformation, Misunderstood Creatures, Multimedia, nature, nature conservation, Predator, Prey, talking mascots, teaching, Uncategorized, vlogs, Wild Animals, wildlife, wildlife education, wolf conservation, wolf reintroduction, wolves

Wolf News Episodes 3 and 4

Wolf News Episodes 3 and 4

Episode 3 talks about wolf hunting. Sweden, as of the time this video was recorded, legalized limited wolf hunting in three regions of its territory.  Although the bag limits for wolves during this hunt are very low and restricted, critics say this is a terrible breach of ethics, saying that the Swedish wolf population is too low to withstand a hunt and current populations are suffering from inbreeding as it is thanks to a lack of a stable population.

Meanwhile, Michgan, at the time we filmed this, passed a bill listing wolves as a game animal. However, a wolf hunt does not appear to be on the horizon anytime soon.  The push for this bill to pass came after concerns were raised by farmers about protection for their livestock and dogs as well as hunters worrying about a decline in other game animals.  There has been a lot of backlash over the passing of this bill as wolf populations aren’t high enough to warrant hunting.

Episode 4 focuses on the complications facing the reintroduction of red wolves in North Carolina. Despite the program starting off on a strong note with the success of cross-fostering and the cooperation of area landowners, the attitude in general has changed.  Thanks to misinformation from former program managers and regarding compensation for damages or losses to livestock due to wolves.  And again, here, it seems there is a concern about how much of an affect wolves have on game animal populations.  What complicates this further is that coyote populations are on the rise without wolves to keep things balances, which is creating similar problems.  As far as the extremely low wolf populations go, they are interbreeding with coyotes  and as a result, a hybrid species is now taking root in the area, known as coywolves.