Posted in Amphibians, animal facts, animal games, animal mascots, animals, Aquatic Life, arctic foxes, Arts, biodiversity, bird mascots, birds, birds of prey, Carnivore, Community Events, conservation, coyotes, ecology, educational mascots, End of Year Review, endangered species, Entertainment, environment, Exercise, Farmers Markets, foxes, foxes of north america, Fun Animal Facts, Holiday Events, kestrels, learning, Mammals, mascots, Misunderstood Creatures, nature camp, nature conservation, Omnivore, Raptor Research, raptors, Rochester, NY Events, Small Business, storytelling, summer camps, talking mascots, teaching, Western New York Organizations, Wild Animals, wildlife, wildlife education, wolf conservation, wolves, Yoga

Summer 2019 Wrap Up

By Nick Hadad

It’s been an amazing summer here at ROC Animal School! Here’s a brief breakdown of all the fun we’ve had!

New Characters:

We appeared almost every Saturday from mid June until the end of September at the Pittsford Village Community Farmers Market at their new location behind the Community Center. We covered a new theme each weekend, which required a few new mascots. We debuted a frog, a woodpecker, a skunk (for National Skunk Day), and a raccoon!

Summer Camps

We visited numerous summer camps over the season, including several visits to Nature Camp at the Genesee Country Village and Museum. We were able to bring out multiple characters and perform various programs each day at the camps, delighting and educating campers of all ages.

Other Events

We were able to take part in a plethora of other special events between late spring and early fall. As always, we loved being able to perform at Bird of Prey Days for Braddock Bay Raptor Research. This year’s event was red tail hawk themed which gave us a chance to use our red tail hawk character, Talon, for the first time in years. We created the program, “A Red Tail Hawk Survival Guide” and got folks up and soaring with us on stage, locking talons in a mock-courtship demonstration and hunting toy snakes by using their wings and feet.

We also entertained at A Frog’s House in Pittsford, the Wildlife Expo at the Dome, various 4H events, the Rochester Museum and Science Center, Science Saturdays with the Rochester March for Science, several events in the community with Braddock Bay Raptor Research, the Genesee County Village and Museum (Owl Moon and Trick or Treating in the Village) and even some craft shows!

Yoga!

While at the farmers market, we teamed up with our friend Erin from Flower City Yoga. We would typically do one family friendly yoga session at noon in the grassy field but there were some Saturdays where we did up to seven! Where else could folks do pigeon pose with an owl, tree pose with a raccoon or unicorn pose with a unicorn? We certainly hope to continue this next year!

Content

With so many events, we had a need to expand upon our program roster and our educational content. This involved a lot of animal behaviour observations, gathering updates on different animal population statistics and learning new vocalizations for various species.

The hard work paid off. Folks enjoyed learning how to dance like a skunk, chitter like raccoons, bark like gray foxes, and play new animal themed games.

Summary and a Look Ahead

As we enter November, it’s fun to look back on such a busy and fun summer. It certainly makes us excited about the possibilities for next year! We do have plans to hopefully create a few new characters, if funds allow, and focus on some species that tend to slip under the radar of the public even if these animals are common in their areas. We will also continue to improve and expand on our programs. Once everything is complete to our satisfaction, we will post an updated list of those.

Until next time, stay wild!

Posted in Amphibians, animal facts, animals, biodiversity, birds, ecology, education, Entertainment, environment, nature, Uncategorized, Wild Animals, wildlife, wildlife education

Fun Animal Facts: July 28 – August 3 Recap

Another week, another set of odd and intriguing animal facts. Here is the collection we have for you this time:

  • Babirusas are Indonesian pigs, or “pig-deer” in Malay, with slender, deer-like legs & multi-chambered stomachs.(Info from Wired, https://t.co/WHJ6bCqN6y)
  • The noises we associate with eagles from TV and nature documentaries actually come from Red Tailed Hawks. Eagles don’t sound ferocious: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Roni4GG56Ew
  • peeperSpring Peepers are tiny chorus frogs that appear at the beginning of spring & chirp in large groups at night
  • The American Alligator specigatores is more than 150 million years old, meaning it was around back when dinosaurs existed! Talk about survival of the fittest! Photo from animalspot.net
  • Coyotes have their own unique language coyotewith simple sentences consisting of yips, barks and howls. Photo from stevedalepetworld.com
  • Pallas’ Cats, or Manuls, have the longest, most dense fur of any cat. These wild felines live in Central Asia. https://t.co/2PHXtC6p3s
  • Blue birds do not actually have blue pigment. Rather, microscopic structures in their feathers reflect and refract blue light.Information from the National Audubon Society, http://www.audubon.org/

That’s all we have for animal facts at the moment. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube for more videos, photos, facts and updates!

Posted in animal facts, animals, Arts, biodiversity, ecology, education, Entertainment, Farmers Markets, nature, nature conservation, Small Business, wildlife, wildlife education

Fun Animal Facts: Weekly Recap

We’ve had a busy week! Video shoots, Turtles Around Town, the 2016 Rochester Pride Parade and, of course, a series of fun animal facts. Also, our fox puppet, Jingo, sang a “Tom’s Diner” parody because she is a saucy little fox.

If you are hoping to see us out and about, Howler Wolf will be with the Wildlife Educators Coalition at Cool Kids! in Brockport this Friday from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. We will also be at both the Pittsford Village Community Farmers Market and the Brighton Farmers Market this Saturday and Sunday with one of our talking animal characters. So come on by, support our local businesses, get some amazing food (seriously, I cannot praise the quality and variety of food and drinks vendors have at these markets enough) and enjoy the sun!

Without further ado, here is our assemblage of animal facts from the past week:

  • Domesticated goats can quickly revert back to their feral state out in the wild. The same goes for domesticated cats!
  • Common Garters are New York State’s mostGarter Snake common snake species. Between 16 and 30 inches long, they eat insects, slugs, worms, and even the occasional frog or mouse! (Photo from Wikipedia)
  • Fun Animal Fact: All the Kongs in “Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze” are designed after real monkeys.
    DKC TF
    Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze

    Donkey Kong = Mountain Gorilla
    Diddy = Spider Monkey
    Cranky & Funky = Gorilla
    Dixie = Chimpanzee
    Poison Dart Frog

  • Poison Dart Frogs’ bodies have elaborate designs & brilliant colors to ward off potential predators, a natural defense tactic called aposematic coloration. (Photo from National Geographic Kids)tegu
  • Tegus are a group of large omnivorous lizards native to Central and South America. The amount of meat tegus consume decreases as they mature. Pictured below is an Argentine Black and White Tegu, the largest of all tegus. (Photo Credit: Branson’s Wild World)Peafowl
  • Peacocks are actually male peafowl. Females are referred to as peahens, babies are peachicks, and a group of peafowl are an Ostentation or Muster. (Photo Credit: Coqui de Vicente on Pinterest)Koala
  • Koalas are anatomically designed to hang out in tree branches for extended periods. They have thick rump fur, a cartilaginous pad at their spine’s base, a curved backbone, and two fewer pairs of ribs than most mammals (11 instead of 13), which creates a curled skeletal structure that allows koalas to lounge in tree forks. (Photo and information from: http://www.animalfactguide.com/animal-facts/koala/)
  • Monarch Butterflies are the only butterflies Monarchsthat make two-way, multi-generational migrations. In the fall, our North Eastern Monarchs travel 1,000s of miles from here to Mexico! (Photo from Amusing Planet)

Those are all of our facts for this week. Remember, Animal School is also on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube, so check in with us regularly to keep up with our entertaining animals, arts and insights into wildlife. We’re all over the place!